• Reception Rooms:

    As a busy wedding DJ I see it all, the good, the very good, the bad and the REALLY bad. So I have decided to write a few short blogs that will hopefully help B&G’s to-be make some decisions about their wedding day. I don’t want to offend anyone that I have personally DJ’d for previously. With that I’ll be talking in general terms and speaking about how I would do it, if I were doing it again!

     

    We all imagine organising a wedding can’t be too hard before we actually do it, but honestly it’s a daunting experience. I know because I have done it! What is important to note is; you can’t learn from your mistakes because you (generally) only organise a wedding once…well that’s the plan anyway right?!

     

    Where?

     

    As soon as a couple get engaged, the first question (besides “show me the ring”) is, when and where are you getting married? It’s an exciting time, looking at reception venues and talking about dates. Saying that, it can also be stressful. Couples tell me that they have felt stressed and under pressure to tie down a date and venue to suit everyone. In the midst of this, they often choose a venue without really considering the size of the function room.

     

    One of the biggest mistakes is choosing a reception venue with a room that is too big. If a room holds between 200 and 300 people, and you only have 100 guests coming – it is going to feel cavernous. Some people think their guests will be more comfortable and wedding coordinators convince them that it will be fine. The reality is, your room will lack atmosphere! While it’s not ideal to have 12 people squished around a table made for 8, the opposite is much worse.

     

    Money:

     

    One thing B&G’s don’t take into consideration is that while you might have 100 guests, you are unlikely to ever have 100 people in the room once the meal finishes. People go to the bar, outside, to the bathroom, to their bedroom etc. and what you are left with is only about 80% of people in the room at any one time – maximum. So now, all of a sudden, you only have 80 people in that room built to hold seat 300 people.

     

    B&G’s often invest big money into the music for their wedding day. Rightly so, as it will make it a memorable night for your guests but even the best, most expensive band or DJ can’t create an atmosphere in an empty room. When I speak to my B&G’s, I tell them… “My main aim is to create a party for you and your guests!” but how can I do that if people are too self-conscious to dance on an empty dance-floor?

     

    I heard of an incredible wedding recently. The church was beautiful, the bride was stunning, the hotel was fantastic and the food delicious. The hotel reception ballroom was ornate with high ceilings and shimmering chandeliers and it held over 400 people. But what the B&G didn’t think about was how the room would look. There were 38 guests, yes, THIRTY EIGHT guests ranging from 9 years of age to 80 and there was no more than 16-17 people in the room at any one time. You get the idea.

     

    Summary:

     

    Make sure when booking your hotel reception, that it is a suitable size for YOUR wedding. If it seems a little too tight for your number, that’s ideal. It will ensure a party environment on your big day. Remember you only get one chance to get this right and I hope this was helpful. Thanks for reading and contact me with any enquiries.

  • 1 comment

    Totally agree. One wedding coordinator (in a venue that shall remain nameless) tried to tell me that a room that can hold 400 people would be absolutely fine with 120 people in it. It was the first venue we saw after getting engaged and we nearly believed her because we loved the venue so much. SO glad we didn't

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